Papers on Climate, Radiation etc.

This list is very short at the moment. I will add to it slowly.

Radiation

George C. Simpson, 1927: Some Studies in Terrestrial Radiation. Memoirs of the Royal Meteorological Society 2(16) 69-95.
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George C. Simpson, 1928: Further Studies in Terrestrial Radiation. Memoirs of the Royal Meteorological Society 3(21) 1-26.
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George C. Simpson, 1929: The Distribution of Terrestrial Radiation. Memoirs of the Royal Meteorological Society 3(23) 53-78.
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George C. Simpson, 1929. Discussion of Memoirs. Quarterly J. Royal Meteorological Society 55 73-79.
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Hergesell, H. 1919:. Die Strahlung der Atmosphaere unter Zugrundelegung vom Lindenbergen Temperatur- und Feuchtigkeitsmessungen. Die Arbeiten des Preusslichen Aeronautischen Observatoriums bei Lindenberg 13, 1-24.
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Climate

Budyko, M. I., 1969. the effect of solar radiation variations on the climate of the Earth. Tellus 5, 611-619
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Sellers, W. D. 1969. A global climatic model based on the energy balance of the Earth-Atmosphere system. J. Appl. Meteor. 8, 392-400
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The Budyko and Sellers papers introduced so-called energy-balance models (also called Budyko-Sellers models), which are rather simple models, often one-dimensional (latitude) that predict the surface temperature using very simple radiation schemes and a simple, often diffusive, parameterization of meridional heat flux. Among other things, the notion of ice-albedo feedback, and the possibility of multiple climate equilibria and a snowball earth, were elucidated with this kind of model.

Hasselmann, K. 1976. Stochastic climate models. Part 1. Theory Tellus 8, 392-400
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This paper essentially presents the null-hypothesis of climate variability, that climate variability originates in the weather variability of the atmosphere, which one might suppose to be white noise, and this is reddened by the interaction with the ocean, with its large heat capacity. Although it is likely that other, more deterministic and possibly more predictable, mechanisms of climate variability exist (for example, long term variations in the ocean circulation), Hasselmann's mechanism almost certainly accounts for some of the long term variance in the climate signal. The Hasselmann paper was followed by one by Frankignoul and Hasselmann (Tellus, 1977, 284-305) that applies these ideas to sea-surface temperature anomalies.